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FACTS ABOUT CBD?

What is CBD?

1. CBD is a key ingredient in cannabis


CBD is one of over 60 compounds found in cannabis that belong to a class of molecules called cannabinoids. Of these compounds, CBD and THC are usually present in the highest concentrations and are therefore the most recognized and studied.


CBD and THC levels tend to vary among different plants. Marijuana grown for recreational purposes often contains more THC than CBD.


However, by using selective breeding techniques, cannabis breeders have managed to create varieties with high levels of CBD and next to zero levels of THC. These strains are rare but have become more popular in recent years.


2. CBD is non-psychoactive


Unlike THC, CBD does not cause a high. While this makes CBD a poor choice for recreational users, it gives the chemical a significant advantage as a medicine, since health professionals prefer treatments with minimal side effects.


CBD is non-psychoactive because it does not act on the same pathways as THC. These pathways, called CB1 receptors, are highly concentrated in the brain and are responsible for the mind-altering effects of THC.


A 2011 review published in Current Drug Safety concludes that CBD “does not interfere with several psychomotor and psychological functions.” The authors add that several studies suggest that CBD is “well tolerated and safe” even at high doses.


3. CBD has a wide range of medical benefits


Although CBD and THC act on different pathways of the body, they seem to have many of the same medical benefits.  PLEASE DO NOT MAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICAL CLAIMS!!!  THIS WILL AND CAN RESULT IN GETTING SHUT DOWN.  This is merely a reference guide.

Medical Properties of CBD    Effects


* Antiemetic    Reduces nausea and vomiting
Anticonvulsant    Suppresses seizure activity
Antipsychotic    Combats psychosis disorders
Anti-inflammatory    Combats inflammatory disorders
* Anti-oxidant    Combats neurodegenerative disorders
* Anti-tumoral/Anti-cancer    Combats tumor and cancer cells
* Anxiolytic/Anti-depressant    Combats anxiety and depression disorders


Unfortunately, most of this evidence comes from animals, since very few studies on CBD have been carried out in human patients.

CBD reduces the negative effects of THC
CBD seems to offer natural protection against the marijuana high. Numerous studies suggest that CBD acts to reduce the intoxicating effects of THC, such as memory impairment and paranoia.
CBD also appears to counteract the sleep-inducing effects of THC, which may explain why some strains of cannabis are known to increase alertness.


Both CBD and THC have been found to present no risk of lethal overdose. However, to reduce potential side effects, medical users may be better off using cannabis with higher levels of CBD.

The products that come from AON American are domestically organically grown Hemp plants from Northern California, Colorado, and Michigan.  They contain, at the most, only .3% THC which is the legal government limit for Hemp products.  They are not imported Industrial hemp products from Europe that are used for chicken feed and clothing.
If you are ever unsure of an answer please PM ME or someone else.  The last thing we want is a misrepresentation of our Products or other incorrect information shared.

Latest version by Melanie Mathews

See how cannabis is prepared, extracted

and made into cannabis oil.

Dr. Raphael Mechoulan

The Father Of Cannabis

“The Scientist” is a documentary that traces the story of Dr. Mechoulam from his early days......as a child of the Holocaust in Bulgaria, through his immigration to Israel and his career as the chief investigator into the chemistry and biology of the world’s most misunderstood plant. Dr. Mechoulam ascertained that THC interacts with the largest receptor system in the human body, the endocannabinoid system (ECS).
 

What is Cannabidiol? (CBD)

Cannabidiol is a cannabinoid and a major component of the cannabis plant, or marijuana plant. By itself, it lacks the psychoactive effects most commonly associated with marijuana use yet still retains many of the medicinal benefits, such as its anti-seizure and anti-inflammatory effects

Cannabidiol | Weed | CBD Hemp Oil CNN Special Dr. Sanjay Gupta 2014 Documentary

CBD Oil Actually Helped

With My Anxiety

By Jenni Miller

The cannabidiol tincture I drop under my tongue tastes a little bit like mint chocolate, with the unmistakable slip of coconut oil. Within minutes, I feel a little foggy and a little cozy, and all I want to do is watch The Great British Bake Off or perhaps do some crosswords. I’ve taken too much on occasion, and it gives me a shaky feeling similar to smoking pot, but if I take just a few drops, I feel delightful. Maybe a little too delightful judging by the emails I’ve sent people I care about, but it’s a small trade-off for me. (Sorry, everyone.)

 

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a chemical found in marijuana, the yin to THC’s yang; theoretically, it’s not psychoactive, i.e., it doesn’t make you feel high in the same way as ingesting a high-THC strain of weed. People use it for everything from epilepsy to pain relief and anxiety, which was my main point of interest. CBD derived from hemp is legal in New York State, and it’s available at your local head shop or the obscure drug store; I bought mine online from a sleek lifestyle site that offers DIY salve recipes and hemp oils specifically for pets.

 

Anxietyobsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression have followed me like a cloud since I was a child. The relief I found in little pre-Prozac-era pills can’t be overstated; I can’t imagine what my life would have been like — would be like — without antidepressants. But the thing with medication is that, for me, it’s merely another tool in an arsenal that includes talk therapy, meditation, acupuncture, aerial yoga (yes, really), and other more holistic treatments.

 

The popular benzodiazepine Klonopin has been my go-to for daily anxiety maintenance and panic attacks since I was 19. It makes me sleepy and dopey, and, as any Valley of the Dolls fan will tell you, benzos are highly addictive. As soon as I heard about CBD, my interest was piqued, but a quick Google will turn up many more sites extolling the virtues of the drug (and selling it) than any hard-and-fast data about how it works.

 

I turned to Dr. Margaret Haney, Professor of Neurobiology and Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center for more information about CBD. “It’s a drug that seems to act at a wide range of brain sites,” she said, “so in terms of anxiety, one of its potential mechanisms could be acting at one of the serotonin receptors, so as you know, anxiety medications and antidepressants are often acting on the serotonin system. SSRI is [short for] selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. So, that’s potentially one mechanism for CBD to affect anxiety, but again, we don’t know.”

 

Marijuana, along with heroin, LSD, and MDMA, is still a Schedule 1 drug, which makes it very difficult to study the same way you would, say, the next cash-cow SSRI. Haney explained, “You would really want to study CBD as compared to [a] placebo and measures of anxiety,” she said, adding, “There have been a handful of studies giving CBD orally and looking at measures of anxiety, and there seems to be a suggestion that it has some anxiolytic effects — some effects that decrease anxiety — but in terms of comparing to FDA-approved anxiolytics or, you know, really assessing what daily use of cannabidiol for anxiety is, there is very little data.

“As with most things in the marijuana field, society has jumped far, far ahead of the science. We still have a lot to do with cannabidiol, and so, again, to comment on whether it’s safe to combine with other medications or to compare to FDA-approved medications, we just don’t have any data really on that.”

 

Dr. Julie Holland is one of the few psychopharmacologists to study and write about the use of marijuana as an adjunct or alternative to psych meds. Holland, who is the author of Weekends at Bellevue, Moody Bitches, Ecstasy: The Complete Guide, and The Pot Book, offered me more information on the possible pros and cons of using CBD in lieu of Klonopin or similar drugs. They “can help with anxiety but can make you less sharp cognitively … a little fuzzy, with memory problems or sedation.” (Perhaps this explains why I can never find my keys, or my phone, or my Metrocard.) “Benzos have risk of tolerance and withdrawal and [they’re] dangerous to mix with alcohol. CBD doesn’t seem to have these issues.”

 

As Holland pointed out, “No one has done these sorts of drug-interaction studies, but my guess is that you could. I certainly have patients mixing cannabis and SSRIs.” Before I embarked on my little science experiment, I ran the idea by my own meds doc, who more or less gave me the go-ahead. While I didn’t ask, anecdotal data — i.e., me and my friends — suggests that Holland’s patients aren’t the only people mixing pot and antidepressants.

 

While I tinker with my meds with help from my own psychopharm, looking for the ideal dose and balance that won’t tip me into an insomniac mess or a snoozy lump on my couch, CBD is, at the very least, an interesting way to spend a few hours chilling out without getting the munchies or spinning out in my own brain. It’s definitely not a magic bullet, and I wouldn’t use it if I were in crisis or about to get on an airplane, but I’m glad I found it. I look forward to the day I can use high-quality CBD derived from marijuana whenever I want.

I Tried CBD Oil To Deal With Anxiety Here’s My Honest Review

Nope, it won't get you high ... but it can help with anxiety, depression, and brain function.

 By Michelle Pellizzon January 24, 2017

Image: blog.zuluandzephyr.com

Just a week before my friends and I were set to start our senior year of high school, we were gathering at a restaurant for a birthday dinner. I was just about to walk into the restaurant when I realized something strange—I couldn’t hear anything. I could see peoples’ mouths moving, but couldn’t decipher what they were saying.

 

And then I woke up on the concrete, a worried crowd gathered around me. “You had a seizure,” my friend said gently as I blinked my eyes, trying to process this new information.  I remember it was warm that night because I was wearing a sundress, and when I finally regained consciousness my first worry was that my dress flew up and everyone could see my underwear.

 

After months of visiting doctors and sitting through tests like a human lab rat, it was determined that there was a slight anomaly in the anatomy of my temporal lobe—the part of the brain that controls hearing, speech, and auditory comprehension—which explains why every time I have a seizure, I suddenly don’t understand the English language. Epilepsy can’t be cured, so the only course of action available for me was to take a medication every day for the rest of my life. My neurologist prescribed a few different anti-convulsant medications, but they all made me feel tired, depressed, slow, and unlike myself—until finally,

I found one that was slightly better than the rest.

Eventually, I took my health into my own hands. A lot of research, education, and trial and error led me to where I am now—a person with epilepsy who uses food and holistic practices to manage my diagnosis.

Then a few months ago, my Facebook messages inbox exploded.

“Have you seen this?” 
“Do you take this?” 
“This is amazing!” 

Friends and family members were sending me articles about CBD—a hemp-based, non-psychoactive oil that contains canabidiol—that had been shown to stop seizures in their tracks.

 

 

At first, I was wary. Although I live in Los Angeles, where it seems like there’s a medical marijuana depot on every corner, I’m not one for doing drugs (legal or otherwise). I mean, I don’t even take Advil when I get a headache!  But despite the fact that CBD oil is made from hemp, it doesn’t contain THC. THC is the compound responsible for the “high” that comes with ingesting marijuana. In fact, scientific reviews have proven that CBD “does not interfere with several psychomotor and psychological functions,” and is safe to ingest without any side effects. Let me repeat: YOU WILL NOT GET HIGH FROM CBD!

 

Here’s the thing, though—CBD oil isn’t just helpful for people with epilepsy. Turns out the oil is highly anti-inflammatory, and according to a 2013 review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology it’s also beneficial for treating anxiety, depression, neurodegenerative disorders like dementia, and even has anti-tumoral properties. Sounds like the ultimate superfood, right? I decided to give this magic oil a whirl and see if I noticed a difference in my mood, anxiety, and stress levels.

 

1 Day one

 

After consulting with Amanda Chantal Bacon of Moon Juice, I decided to invest in a bottle of CBD Oil in the 500mg tincture. Gone Green is a really incredible company that only sources the best herbs, adaptogens, and superfoods, so I knew I would be getting a very high-quality product when I grabbed their bottle off of Moon Juice’s shelf. You can buy aonmothernature.com it’s 100% legal in all 50 states. They have the best customer service ever, and they carry tons of other fantastic products that any health-conscious person would love!

 

 

I stopped by Moon Juice after work, feeling a little nervous and excited all at once. “You might notice that your body feels a bit heavy after you try it—sometimes when I take it I feel like I just want to sit down and chill,” said the women behind the Moon Juice counter who helped me. Prepped for potential side effects, I emptied one dropper’s worth of CBD oil into my chamomile tea as soon as I got home … And didn’t feel anything. A few hours later I got into bed and immediately fell asleep.

 

2 Day two

 

Bacon had said that I might need to try two full droppers worth of the oil to really feel its benefits. I knew that I had an incredibly busy and stressful day ahead of me—I needed to fit in a five mile run before work, had lots to do at the office, was scheduled for a busy event in the middle of the day, and had a 2-hour meditation class later that night which would require a lot of mental clarity. Tentatively, I squirted two droppers of CBD oil into my bulletproof coffee and sipped away.

 

When I landed at my desk I was ready to work, and I feel like I was able to focus and accomplish more in a shorter period of time. The real test, though, was when I had to drive through bumper-to-bumper traffic in downtown LA in order to get to the Indie Beauty Expo—and I was able to do it with absolutely zero road rage … a big thing for me!

 

Because I never go downtown, I had to stop for a latte at my favorite coffee shop—and a second CBD pick-me-up. By the time I stepped into the crowded Indie Beauty Expo, I felt calm and happy. As an introvert, I usually have a hard time making small talk at events. But post-CBD oil, I felt comfortable enough to chat up a storm with every person I met! Three hours later I dragged myself out of the huge exposition and made it to my meditation class, where I took another dropper of CBD oil. Although I really love meditating, I find it particularly challenging to get into the “zone” after a long day at work. Not so much after taking some CBD—it was easy to calm my mind and tune into my breath, despite how fast-paced my day had been.

 

3 Day three

 

I woke up seriously looking forward to my morning CBD oil fix … I mean, tonic. Truth be told, I’m an anxious person. Although I do a lot to try and calm my nerves, sometimes anxiety gets the best of me. But regardless of emotional or physical stress (I’m training for a marathon and running quite a bit!), I experienced this week, I felt a lot more in control after drinking my CBD oil tonics.  After work, I met up with a friend and felt like I could fully focus on our conversation without distractions. Could it be the CBD?

 

Conclusion

 

Honestly, I began to wonder if I was just experiencing the placebo effect. But on the one day, I didn’t take my CBD oil, I ended up picking a fight with my boyfriend (totally my fault) and let a few off-color remarks by a family member mess with my mood. Truly, I feel like if was a bit less anxious, both of those incidents could have been diverted.

 

As for my epilepsy, I can’t conclusively say that CBD oil cured or healed me. I’ve lived a very particular lifestyle for a long time, which is how I’ve been able to treat my condition. That being said, stress is a huge trigger for many people with epilepsy—and I know that using CBD helped me manage my stress in a more healthy way.

Bottom line? I’m definitely going to keep taking this stuff!

 

 

 

 

 

The Biology and Potential Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol

"Cannabidiol: Barriers to Research and Potential

Medical Benefits"
 

June 24, 2015

 

presented by Nora D. Volkow, Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse

Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control

 

 

Mr. Chairman, Ms. Chairwoman, and Members of the Senate Drug Caucus, thank you for inviting the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to participate in this hearing to share what we know about the biology and the potential therapeutic effects of cannabidiol (CBD), one of the main active chemical compounds found in marijuana. In light of the rapidly evolving interest in the potential use of marijuana and its derivative compounds for medical purposes, it is important to take stock of what we know and do not know about the therapeutic potential of CBD.

 

Background

 

To date, 23 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws allowing marijuana to be used for a variety of medical conditions. Fifteen additional states have enacted laws intended to allow access to CBD oil and/or high-CBD strains of marijuana. Interest in the potential therapeutic effects of CBD has been growing rapidly, partially in response to media attention surrounding the use of CBD oil in young children with intractable seizure disorders including Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. While there are promising preliminary data, the scientific literature is currently insufficient to either prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy.i and further clinical evaluation is warranted. In addition to epilepsy, the therapeutic potential of CBD is currently being explored for a number of indications including anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, schizophrenia, cancer, pain, inflammatory diseases and others. My testimony will provide an overview of what the science tells us about the therapeutic potential of CBD and of the ongoing research supported by NIH in this area.

 

CBD Biology and Therapeutic Rationale

 

CBD is one of more than 80 active cannabinoid chemicals in the marijuana plant.ii Unlike the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not produce euphoria or intoxication, Cannabinoids have their effect mainly by interacting with specific receptors on cells in the brain and body: the CB1 receptor, found on neurons and glial cells in various parts of the brain, and the CB2 receptor, found mainly in the body’s immune system. The euphoric effects of THC are caused by its activation of CB1 receptors. CBD has a very low affinity for these receptors (100 fold less than THC) and when it binds it produces little to no effect. There is also growing evidence that CBD acts on other brain signaling systems, and that these actions may be important contributors to its therapeutic effects.

 

Preclinical and Clinical Evidence

 

Rigorous clinical studies are still needed to evaluate the clinical potential of CBD for specific conditions. However, pre-clinical research (including both cell culture and animal models) has shown CBD to have a range of effects that may be therapeutically useful, including anti-seizure, antioxidant, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-tumor, anti-psychotic, and anti-anxiety properties.

 

Anti-Seizure Effects

 

A number of studies over the last two decades or more have reported that CBD has anti-seizure activity, reducing the severity of seizures in animal models. In addition, there have been a number of case studies and anecdotal reports suggesting that CBD may be effective in treating children with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, there have only been a few small randomized clinical trials examining the efficacy of CBD as a treatment for epilepsy; the total number of subjects enrolled in these studies was 48. Three of the four studies reported positive results, including decreased frequency of seizures. However, the studies suffered from significant design flaws, including failure to fully quantify baseline seizure frequency, inadequate statistical analysis, and a lack of sufficient detail to adequately evaluate and interpret the findings.viiiTherefore, the currently available information is insufficient to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of CBD as a treatment for epilepsy; a recent Cochrane review concluded, there is a need for “a series of properly designed, high quality, and adequately powered trials.”

 

NIDA is currently collaborating with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to evaluate CBD in animal models of epilepsy in order to understand the underlying mechanisms and optimize the conditions under which CBD may treat seizure disorders, and determine whether it works synergistically with other anti-seizure medications. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway by GW Pharmaceuticals, testing the efficacy of Epidiolex, a purified CBD extract, for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy.

 

Analgesic Effects

 

There have been multiple clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of nabiximols on central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer pain. In addition, nabiximols is currently approved in Canada for the treatment of central neuropathic pain in MS and cancer pain unresponsive to opioid therapy. However, the current evidence suggests that the analgesia is mediated by THC and it is unclear whether CBD contributes to the therapeutic effects THC alone has been shown to reduce pain; we are unaware of clinical studies that have explored the efficacy of CBD alone on pain. However, the anti-inflammatory properties of CBD (discussed above) could be predicted to play a role in the analgesic effects of nabiximols. Recent research has also suggested that cannabinoids and opioids have different mechanisms for reducing pain and that their effects may be additive, which suggests that combination therapies may be developed that may have reduced risks compared to current opioid therapies. However, this work is very preliminary.

 

Anti-Tumor Effects

 

In addition to the research on the use of cannabinoids in palliative treatments for cancer—reducing pain and nausea and in increasing appetite—there are also several pre-clinical reports showing anti-tumor effects of CBD in cell culture and in animal models.xxviii These studies have found reduced cell viability, increased cancer cell death, decreased tumor growth, and inhibition of metastasis (reviewed in McAllister et al, 2015).xxix These effects may be due to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of CBD However these findings have not yet been explored in human patients. There are multiple industry sponsored clinical trials underway to begin to test the efficacy of CBD in human cancer patients.

 

Anti-Psychotic Effects

 

Marijuana can produce acute psychotic episodes at high doses, and several studies have linked marijuana use to increased risk for chronic psychosis in individuals with specific genetic risk factors. Research suggests that these effects are mediated by THC, and it has been suggested that CBD may mitigate these effects.xxxi There have been a few small-scale clinical trials in which patients with psychotic symptoms were treated with CBD, including case reports of patients with schizophrenia that reported conflicting results; a small case study in patients with Parkinson’s disease with psychosis, which reported positive results; and one small randomized clinical trial reporting clinical improvement in patients with schizophrenia treated with CBD.xxxiiLarge randomized clinical trials would be needed to fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of CBD for patients with schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis.

 

 

Anti-Anxiety Effects

 

CBD has shown therapeutic efficacy in a range of animal models of anxiety and stress, reducing both behavioral and physiological (e.g., heart rate) measures of stress and anxiety. In addition, CBD has shown efficacy in small human laboratory and clinical trials. CBD reduced anxiety in patients with social anxiety subjected to a stressful public speaking task. In a laboratory protocol designed to model post-traumatic stress disorders, CBD improved “consolidation of extinction learning”, in other words, forgetting of traumatic memories.  The anxiety-reducing effects of CBD appear to be mediated by alterations in serotonin receptor 1a signaling, although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated and more research is needed.

 

 

Efficacy for Treating Substance Use Disorders

 

Early preclinical findings also suggest that CBD may have therapeutic value as a treatment of substance use disorders. CBD reduced the rewarding effects of morphine and reduced cue-induced heroin seeking in animal models. A few small clinical trials have examined CBD and/or nabiximols (THC/CBD) for the treatment of substance use disorders; however, the available data are not sufficient to draw conclusions. NIDA is supporting multiple ongoing clinical trials in this area.

 

 

Safety of CBD

 

For reasons discussed previously, despite its molecular similarity to THC, CBD only interacts with cannabinoid receptors weakly at very high doses (100 times that of THC), and the alterations in thinking and perception caused by THC are not observed with CBD.iii.iv,v The different pharmacological properties of CBD give it a different safety profile from THC.

A review of 25 studies on the safety and efficacy of CBD did not identify significant side effects across a wide range of dosages, including acute and chronic dose regimens, using various modes of administration.xli CBD is present in nabiximols which, as noted earlier, is approved throughout most of Europe and in other countries. Because of this, there is extensive information available with regard to its metabolism, toxicology, and safety. However, additional safety testing among specific patient populations may be warranted should an application be made to the Food and Drug Administration.